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The Turkish flagWhen I moved to Turkey 22 years ago, all I knew and heard about this amazing country was the endless glasses of tea, the kebabs and the Grand Bazar. But if you really want to get under the country’s skin, here are less commonly known things about life and culture in Turkey.

1. Turkish people are extremely hospitable and hot-blooded. Even if you are meeting someone for the first time, you may be invited to fancy dinner or lunch to his or her home. They are open and generous and you are called “Misafer”, guest, so you are high-valued guest and it will be an honour for them to invite you and take care of you.

2.  Most business appointments will take place on time, but traffic in large cities may cause few minutes and sometime over one-hour delay. So if you have meetings in Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir, you may want to consider traffic as you schedule your appointments.

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concept social networkIn our weekly series about events in Public Relations this week we visit Turkey where our colleague Jack Jacob provides us with some insights on the current trends and developments regarding PR events.

Utilize Social Media channels for event promotion

Many firms these days are questioning the benefits of using social media in B2B events. At Promedia we believe all events whether B2B or B2C should have some presence on sites such as Twitter, LinkedIn and even Facebook to some extent. For example Twitter offers B2B event marketers a diverse network and is used heavily by industry professionals and B2B journalists. Read more

Turkey

Today our series features Jack Jacob of ProMedia GlobalCom PR Network partner in Turkey, who gives us some insights into “Tops and Flops” in the Turkish market.

PR topics: tops and flops – what works best in your market?

The common mistake in Turkey is to build relations with Turkish media using the same methods they generally use in foreign countries. Since communication and personal relations are essential, many practices in PR and media relations in different countries show similarities for sure. However, it should be noted that Turkey’s cultural, religious and traditional characteristics are determinant in communications. Media relations in Turkey are based on close and personal friendships, rather than corporate and standardized practices as in the EU and the USA. It would be too optimistic to e-mail press releases to Turkish media and expect them to be published, because the desired result can only be achieved with a media pitch via telephone or visits.

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