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This blog is written by Will Gardiner, Head of Business Technology at CCgroup

The 27th of November saw CCgroup launch its latest division – Business Technology.

There’s a news release here that explains why we think it’s important, what the opportunities are and why we’re equipped to make the most of them. And here’s a link to what PRWeek thought of the announcement.

In a nutshell, CCgroup has historically focused on mobile & telecoms, fintech and cleantech, but this year, several of our new and existing clients turned their focus on the enterprise market. And so, following the management buy-out in August, we established a new division to cater for B2B technology companies and consultancies from four key areas: IT Infrastructure; Workflow IT; Back-Office IT; and Business Intelligence & Big Data. There’s more detail on what these areas comprise of in the news release. Read more

This post was first published by Kacey Albertine on March Communications’ blog PR Nonsense.

PR measurement is an art and science that even many of the brightest minds in the industry haven’t quite figured out yet, and certainly not perfected. Earlier this month, the International Association for the Measurement and Evaluation of Communication (AMEC), the UK Public Relations Consultants Association (PRCA) and the International Communications Consultancy Organisation (ICCO) came together to release a powerful guide on PR measurement.

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This post was first published by Nate Hubbell on March Communications’ blog PR Nonsense.

PR measurement is an art and science that even many of the brightest minds in the industry haven’t quite figured out yet, and certainly not perfected. Earlier this month, the International Association for the Measurement and Evaluation of Communication (AMEC), the UK Public Relations Consultants Association (PRCA) and the International Communications Consultancy Organisation (ICCO) came together to release a powerful guide on PR measurement.

Since March prides itself on “taking the guesswork out of PR,” the March Insights team has delved into the guide to help hone our own tactics and processes for both measurement and research. Below is Part One of a two-part series where Nate Hubbell provides some thoughts on a few of the key points that resonated with him the most, and some thoughts on where they can be further refined or improved. Kacey Albertine will post offer her thoughts in Part Two.

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Richard Merrin, Managing Director of Spreckley Partners in the UK, shares his experience on Research-led PR.

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This post was first published by Sarah Love on March Communications’ blog, PR Nonsense, and may be viewed here.

In PR, we often encourage our clients to conduct research as a way to contribute to the industry news cycle when there is no news coming out of the company. March‘s clients have seen a lot of success with this strategy and, across every industry, many companies will dedicate large portions of their annual marketing budgets to this type of content development. However, while companies typically want this research to come out in their favor – for example, framing their core competency as a must-have to remain competitive – research will fall flat if it isn’t conducted in a vendor-neutral manner and presented fairly. Read more

Not that we really needed any further confirmation that this Internet thing is a real game changer, but hey – statistics are fun!

But actually, this particular stat is quite intriguing. According to some new research from Forrester, Americans now spend as much time online as they do watching TV – about 13 hours/week for each. The research contrasts with some other recent stats on the viewing habits of Americans from Nielsen, which says Americans watch an average of about 5 hours of TV/day, which they say is “more than ever,” but there is no denying from both surveys that while TV viewing continues to increase, the growth of time spent online is exploding in comparison.

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In the theories of media effects the impact of advertising and PR is still a controversial topic. A current study by the University of Applied Sciences Mainz now repeated the analysis of this topic. The result shows: PR works especially, when it comes to communicating knowledge and if arguments have to be believable and convincing- like for so called “High Involvement”- products, with which the costumer specifically deals with before purchasing, for example a new car or a new television.

The classical advertising has the most impact when it comes to products which the costumer is paying less attention to and which are regarded as interchangeable, like products in daily use such as cleaning agent.

„That’s what I always thought about it” is what many PR colleagues might think now, because that’s exactly what I thought when reading the press release.

The same – though not representative – feedback is what we are often getting from our costumers, because IT and Clean Tech are typical High Involvement products. For example: I recently compared the page view numbers of the company’s website together with a client of mine, just because of interest. Everyday when a press release has been published, the number of visors grew rapidly. In contrast, when an advertisement for junior employees has been placed, there were only marginal deflections for this period. Since we do also support the HR-campaign of the company, there are clearly more applications.

And a customer profit can be followed in parts in an article in the trade press (of course the company’s products are also simply good): a Sales Manager was able to send a link to the article in the attachment of an offer. This was the loop for a much personal sales talk and finally the decision for our costumer.

Another interesting story is he case of a customer, whose view numbers of his Xing profile raise up into double digits just in one single day and clearly more contact queries came in, when we shared a press information to expand the German team.

With this study of the University of Applied Sciences Mainz, the effects of PR have finally been proved scientifically by using latest figures and facts. Prof. Dr. Lothar Rolke, head of the study, believes that “the communication-mix is going to change a lot”. I’m keen to see in which direction. At the moment the trend in companies is to reduce the advertising budget or replace it with PR, to the disappointment of the media and certainly not consulting for all participants.

I think sooner or later new mixes of PR and advertising will assert itself. We’ll see which ones.

Jessica Schmidt